The School of Classics would like to wish everyone a happy new year, semester, and term, and what better way to do this than with a brand new departmental blog? Over the coming months, we will be posting about things going on in the School of Classics, activities being undertaken by staff and students, and all sorts of things related to the study of antiquity.  For the first post we thought it would be appropriate to introduce the members of staff (although those of you on the Lampeter campus should all have met at least one of them by now!) and give a brief update on what has been going on in School of Classics so far this academic year.

September 2013 saw a host of new faces arrive in the School: Dr Ruth Parkes (joining us from Oxford), Dr Ralph Haussler (joining us from Osnabruck), Dr Jane Draycott (joining us from Sheffield and the BSR), and Dr Matthew Cobb (admittedly already here, but now on a permanent lectureship).  They brought with them their enthusiasm, experience, and expertise, as well as one well-behaved dog, and join the established members of the School Dr Errietta Bissa, Dr Magdalena Öhrman, Dr James Richardson, and Dr Kyle Erickson (the newly appointed Head of School).

D. J., the new departmental dog.
D. J., the departmental dog.

There have been some other changes.  The Classics Society has been re-established and is thriving.  The School of Classics now has its very own resource room where both undergraduate and postgraduate students can come to utilise the departmental library, access electronic resources, and undertake their own research.  It does, however, need some volunteers to help put all the books in order and create a catalogue!

We hope that everyone managed to get a break over Christmas, see their family, catch up with friends, has come back happy and refreshed and, like us, is looking forward to the new semester and term.

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